Canadian Military Colleges - Universities with a Difference - RMC

 

OCdt Cho

“The experiences you have at RMC are truly unparalleled. There aren’t many other university students who can say they learned how to do loops and rolls in an airplane, trained in weapons handling and hand-to-hand combat, travelled to Japan for a conference or rappelled upside-down on rockfaces.”

Officer Cadet Cho
Aerospace Engineering
Pilot

Ocdt de Grandpré

“It doesn’t matter who you were in high school – if you come to RMC, you’re in for four busy years of learning. The expectations are high, but anyone can succeed here if they’re willing to set their pride aside and learn. The benefits are immeasurable.”

Officer Cadet De Grandpré
Honours History
Logistics Officer

Ocdt Mackin

“I chose RMC for the adventure. You can choose to go to just another regular university, or you can choose to do something that is unique, challenging and rewarding. RMC will give you all these things – all you need to do is put in the work.”

Officer Cadet Mackin
Honours Economics
Naval Warfare Officer

Ocdt Sale

“RMC gave me the opportunity to push myself every day and do things that I never thought I could do.  Whether it is physical and military training, learning a new language or earning my degree, I experienced successes and failures that motivated me to excel and to never quit, never give up.”

Officer Cadet Sale
Honours Political Science
Artillery Officer
 

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Note

Created for Print in July 2019. Printable (pdf) version (4 Mb) is available for download. For updated information consult the Royal Military College of Canada and the Canadian Armed Forces.

Quick Facts

Starting Annual Salary
$26,000.00

5
Astronaut Graduates from
Canadian Military Colleges

 

Universities with a difference

Both Canadian Military Colleges (CMCs); the Royal Military College of Canada (RMC) in Kingston, Ontario, and Royal Military College Saint-Jean (RMC Saint-Jean) in Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu, Quebec, are both military universities — they truly are Universities with a difference.

The CMCs offer, amongst other programmes, the Regular Officer Training Plan (ROTP) — a fully subsidized education plan leading to an undergraduate degree and a commission as an officer in the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF).

As a ROTP student at RMC, you will embark on an invigorating journey to become a part of a proud heritage. Officer cadets and naval cadets are enabled to excel by being immersed in an environment that values excellence in academics, physical fitness, second language proficiency and leadership. The CMC environment cultivates self-discipline, self-motivation and mutual respect, and the College Motto — Truth, Duty, Valour guides staff and students in everything they do.

The education and military experience at RMC will provide you with the professional and intellectual skills necessary to assume the responsibilities and meet the demands of leadership in today’s rapidly changing world. A career as an officer of the CAF will offer you experiences and challenges, serving Canada across the country and around the globe.


The Four Pillars Of Achievement

  • The Military Pillar
  • The Physical Fitness Pillar
  • The Bilingualism Pillar
  • The Academics Pillar
 

The military pillar

Military training

The Military Pillar develops personal skills needed by officers to succeed in today’s complex and rapidly changing world. The Basic Military Officer Qualification will provide the fundamental skills of an effective leader and resource manager. This leadership training will be expanded upon during your studies. Along with other experiences, it prepares the individual for making difficult decisions under stress through a deeper understanding of the factors affecting the role of a leader. The nature of military leadership and military operations necessitate an in-depth understanding of human behaviour; therefore, studies in military psychology and leadership are part of the academic curriculum. Particular emphasis is placed on the importance of personal integrity, ethical behaviour and professional responsibility.

Since the CMC’s goal is to prepare students for their roles as officers of the CAF, it is important for officer cadets and naval cadets to be exposed to and develop leadership traits during their time at the CMC.

Basic Military Officer Qualification (BMOQ)

Students accepted to a CMC begin their first year with BMOQ at the Canadian Forces Leadership and Recruit School (CFLRS) in Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu, Quebec. This introductory programme consists of common military subjects such as general military knowledge, the principles of leadership, military regulations and customs, basic weapons handling, and first aid. Opportunities will also be provided to apply such newly acquired military skills in training exercises involving force protection, field training, navigation and leadership.

First Year Orientation Programme (FYOP)

After attending BMOQ, students will begin full-time studies at a CMC and continue learning the elements of military training during the FYOP. This ends with the running of the Obstacle Course followed by their induction into first year.

 

The Physical Fitness Pillar

Sports and fitness training

The CMCs teach the importance of fitness and a healthy lifestyle. Striving to achieve a higher level of physical fitness improves the quality of life, enables more effective learning, and inspires others. Officer cadets and naval cadets are required to participate in the Physical Education and Athletics programme designed to achieve and maintain a high level of fitness and to learn the basics of a wide variety of team and individual sports.

The Physical Education and Athletics programme helps each officer cadet and naval cadet attain a high level of physical fitness and a level of skill in a wide variety of sports. This programme is compulsory and students are tested periodically to ensure that they meet fitness standards in terms of stamina, agility and strength.

Physical Education

The four years of physical development are designed to achieve increasing levels of athletic fitness. Officer cadets and naval cadets attend a two-hour physical education period each week during the academic year, as well as complete the RMC Physical Performance Test twice per year.

The first year of studies emphasizes proper training and conditioning techniques; the second year emphasizes team sports participation; the third year emphasizes military training, which includes hand-to-hand combat techniques and military fitness; and the fourth year emphasizes specialization in a wide variety of activities and sports.

Athletic Facilities

RMC’s modern athletic facilities cater to a wide variety of sports and activities. The Kingston Military Community Sports Centre houses a 25-metre pool and hot tub, a 200-metre track, a spin room, cardio room, squash courts, a weight room and hardwood courts. There are also tennis courts, soccer fields, rugby pitches, an ice rink, a beach volleyball court, and an ample amount of equipment that provide students with the opportunity to participate in water sports, including windsurfing, canoeing and kayaking, and a variety of activities. The latest addition to the athletic facilities is the sports dome, which contains an 85 by 120 metre turf field. 

The Bilingualism Pillar

Language class

Bilingualism reflects Canada’s cultural heritage. As representatives of this heritage, officers are expected to be functional in both of Canada’s official languages. Responsibilities as an officer of the CAF require leading Canadian men and women who speak both official languages. RMC trains officer cadets and naval cadets to communicate effectively in both English and French through in-class instruction and integration into their daily life. Located in an Anglophone environment, RMC is a great place for Francophones wanting to perfect their linguistic proficiency in English and to rapidly meet CAF bilingualism requirements.

Language Classes

Upon arrival at the College, officer cadets and naval cadets complete a placement test that measures their second official language proficiency. If an officer cadet or naval cadet does not reach the level required by the curriculum of the CMC, they take Second Official Language Education and Training classes.

Officer cadets and naval cadets who require further training will be grouped according to their respective proficiency level and will be required to take language classes each week. Classes are small (a maximum of ten students) and focus on reading comprehension, written expression and oral competency. Students can also reserve online for one-on-one tutorials also offered in all areas of study.

Summer Training

At the end of their second year, officer cadets and naval cadets who have not reached the bilingualism level required by the curriculum will be required to complete an intensive ten-week immersion course. Students are in small group classrooms for five hours of second language courses per day, either at RMC or at CFLS.

Testing

In order to graduate, officer cadets and naval cadets are required to achieve a BBB level recognized by the Canada School of Public Service.

Daily Life

Academic courses are offered in both English and French, which means that officer cadets and naval cadets may be able to enroll in classes instructed in either official language and write all assignments and exams in their first official language. 

The Academics Pillar

Engineering lab

The academic programme is built upon the foundation of a fully accredited undergraduate degree. All university programmes – Engineering, Science, or Social Sciences and Humanities – are balanced with a core curriculum of liberal arts, science and military education in preparation for the complexities of service in the 21st century.

RMC’s Academics Pillar consists of an undergraduate university degree. Students with a secondary school diploma begin their university studies at RMC, or at RMC Saint-Jean. Students completing secondary 5 in Quebec begin their studies by completing Preparatory Year at RMC Saint-Jean, and then continue with university studies at RMC or RMC Saint-Jean should they choose the International Studies programme.

Undergraduate Degrees

RMC offers many four-year degree undergraduate programmes in the Social Sciences and Humanities, Engineering and Science. Double and joint majors, minors, options, and concentrations are possible for the majority of the academic programmes.  

 

Student life as an Officer cadet or Naval cadet

  • Our Campus and Kingston
  • Dorms and Residence
  • Sports and Recreation
  • Student Services

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Our Campus & Kingston

RMC Campus Map

Map of RMC showing buildings, walking paths, and parking zones
1
Canadian Defence Academy
2
Memorial Arch
3
Fort Brant Dormitory
4
For Champlain Dormitory
5
Constantine Arena
6
Currie Building
7
Fort Frederick
8
Girouard Building
9
Old Gym
10
Fort Haldimand Dormitory
11
KMCSC (Athletic Facilities)
12
Fort Lasalle Dormitory
13
MacKenzie Buiding
14
Massey Library
15
Senior Staff Mess
16
Panet House
17
Parade Square
18
Fort Sauvé Dormitory
19
Sawyer Building
20
Security Control Centre
21
Sports Dome
22
Stone Frigate Dormitory
23
Swing Space
24
Yeo Hall
 

Ideally Located

The RMC Campus, rich in history, heritage and tradition, is located on Point Frederick, a small peninsula located near downtown Kingston, Ontario. RMC acknowledges that the land on which it is located is the traditional territory of the Anishinaabe and Haudenosaunee peoples. The College is situated midway between Toronto and Montreal, and only two hours from Ottawa. 

This scenic location at the junction of Lake Ontario and the St. Lawrence River is of great historical importance. It has been an active military site since 1789 and, during the War of 1812, it served as the major naval station in Upper Canada. Ships of the Royal Navy were built and based here. RMC has two national historic sites: the Royal Naval Dockyard and Point Frederick.

Visiting RMC

Undergraduate candidates and their families are encouraged to participate in a tour of RMC. Tours are offered on Mondays and Fridays throughout most of the year and reservations are required. Please find the online booking tool, contact liaison@rmc.ca or call toll free 1‑866‑762‑2672 or 613-541-6000 ext. 6984 to schedule your campus tour.  

Dorms / Residences

ROTP students are required to live on campus. Available single rooms are normally allocated to Fourth Year students. Other senior students are allocated single rooms on a space available basis. First Year students are quartered in double rooms. All residences are co-ed. 

On-campus dining is provided. Students have access to full recreational facilities, including an indoor swimming pool and an ice rink, adjacent to the campus at the Kingston Military Community Sports Centre (KMCSC).

Residence for officer cadets and naval cadets is guaranteed and mandatory. There is no deposit or need to apply. 

 
Paladins

Sports & Recreation

Varsity Sports

RMC is a member of the Ontario University Athletics (OUA), one of four conferences that make up Usports. RMC Varsity teams are open to all with the exception of hockey and rugby, which are men’s teams. RMC’s varsity teams compete in the following OUA sports:  Fencing, Hockey, Rugby, Soccer, and Volleyball

Competitive Clubs

These clubs provide members an enhanced opportunity for training and competition that are otherwise not available as recreational clubs. RMC Competitive Club Teams are open to all with the exception of rugby, which is a women’s Club Team. RMC’s clubs include: 

Rowing, Rugby, Running, Sailing, Swimming, and Taekwondo

Intramural Sports

Officer and naval cadets who are not members of a varsity team or competitive club must participate in the intramural programme and may be involved in organizing and running intramural events. Intramural sports include: ice hockey, ball hockey, basketball, soccer, water polo, ultimate frisbee, and flag football.

Recreational Clubs

Recreational clubs are created and organized by officer cadets and naval cadets with the intent of providing leadership opportunities to students. They also help develop the social skills of those who choose to get involved and to introduce different leisure and athletics activities to the RMC community not already offered through the varsity and intramural programmes. Some of RMC’s recreational clubs include:

  • Astronomy
  • Aviation Enthusiasts
  • Bilingualism
  • Chess
  • Climbing
  • Curling
  • Debate
  • Expedition
  • Judo
  • Paintball / Airsoft
  • Photography
  • Sport Parachuting
  • Stage Band
  • Theatre
  • Multi-Sport
  • War Games
  • Windsurfing
  • Sailing 

Student Services

Students

Delivery of student, staff and faculty support services is accomplished via the cooperative efforts and partnership of many internal and external organizations.  These organizations are all capable of acting as the first point of contact, as well as referring people to other partners, and/or services.  People can walk into the College Success Centre for any reason to find support and help. Sometimes people are referred by professors, peers or the Chain of Command.

The staff of the centre also act as recipients of observations and issues.  The staff help individuals to clarify the issue, in order to identify potential options for resolution, and then either help the person solve the problem or refer them to a service provider who is more skilled at dealing with the issue.

Partners include:

  • Commandant of RMC
  • Chain of Command
  • Academic Wing
  • Office of the Registrar, including Learning Accommodations
  • Writing Centre
  • Math Centre
  • Languages Centre
  • Canadian Forces Moral and Welfare Services
  • Health Services Clinic for physical and mental health services
  • Chaplain Service – Catholic, Protestant and Muslim
  • Therapeutic Dogs of Ontario

The Director of the centre is part of the Canadian Standards Association, working on Mental Health Services and Support standards for post-secondary institutions, and the Director coordinates with Public Health in Kingston in order to create synergy between RMC and the greater community.

Academic Programmes

  • Faculty of Social Sciences and Humanities |
  • Faculty of Engineering |
  • Faculty of Science

Faculty of Social Sciences and Humanities

Bachelor of Arts (Honours or a Major)

Detailed descriptions of the requirements for each Arts Programme can be found at Undergraduate Arts Programmes

Business Administration

The study of business administration accentuates a number of functional areas including accounting, information systems, finance, marketing, operations management and human resource management. The practice of business administration does not take place in a vacuum, and understanding the environmental context and its relationship with a functional area is essential to the development of effective decisions, policies and strategies. The programme provides students with a basic understanding of certain core disciplines, such as quantitative methods, economics and psychology, as well as basic understanding of each of the functional areas listed above.

Economics

Economics is the social science that studies how individuals, firms, and governments make choices about allocating scarce resources to satisfy unlimited needs.  

There are two main branches of economics: microeconomics and macroeconomics. Microeconomics studies the behaviour of individual decision makers such as firms and households. It deals with determination of prices and quantities in individual markets and with the relationship among markets. In contrast, macroeconomics is concerned with the behaviour of the economy as a whole and, in particular, with factors such as unemployment, national income, economic growth, inflation, and price levels.

English, Culture and Communication

The English, Culture and Communication programme is designed to develop and refine communication skills and enhance problem-solving abilities. The programme explores both traditional and non-traditional values in contemporary societies with a view to enhancing critical thinking and insight from the study of literary culture and language and the influence of these values on economics, politics and history. 

French Language, Literature and Culture

The French Language, Literature and Culture programme is designed to improve the students’ communication skills, by teaching them to think critically about and analyze Francophone literature. By studying numerous literary works, students gain an understanding of the importance of cultural and social values in the development of societies and in today’s world, with particular emphasis on “La Francophonie”. The programme also investigates how sociocultural standards vary considerably from one society to another.

History

Appreciating the origins and complexities of the society in which we live requires an understanding of history. The study of history has been described as one of the best possible educations for military leaders, short of actual battlefield experience. The History programme places considerable emphasis on the study of international relations, civil-military relations, and the impact of war on society. It provides a broad exposure to the study of the histories of Canada, the Commonwealth, Europe, the United States, the former Soviet Union, the Middle East, China and Africa. Specialized thematic courses are also available.

Military and Strategic Studies

This programme employs a multidisciplinary approach to the study of international relations, strategic thought and military history, through a combination of core courses in history, political science and psychology. This programme is organized to provide a solid foundation for those who intend to pursue careers in the areas of international relations, defence and security studies.

Political Science

Courses in the Political Science programme are multidisciplinary and focus on a broad spectrum of philosophical, social, political, strategic, military and security issues, both domestic and international, and their political implications. The programme is divided into six major fields of study: Canadian government, international relations, comparative politics, political theory, public administration and policy, and geography. The programme focuses on methods of inquiry and political philosophy, and addresses the big questions of peace, justice, democracy, and equality.

Psychology

The Psychology programme provides students with a philosophical and psychological framework on which to build a sound understanding of the dynamics of leadership. The primary emphasis is on the military experience. The programme focuses on self-awareness and appreciation of human behaviour; the ability to understand and apply influence in social situations; the skill to adapt effective leadership approaches to a variety of circumstances; and an appreciation of the necessity for personal integrity, the importance of human dignity, and the need to reflect continually on one’s values and professional conduct.

Faculty of Engineering

Bachelor of Engineering

Detailed descriptions of the requirements for each engineering programme can be found at Undergraduate Engineering Programmes

Aerospace Engineering

Aerospace Engineering focuses on the design, control and operational performance of aircraft, spacecraft and airborne weapons technologies. Developing vehicles and systems for atmospheric and space environments, Aerospace Engineers have a thorough knowledge of aerodynamics, fluid dynamics, propulsion, aircraft performance, structures, materials, flight dynamics, control and navigation systems, and avionics. Working with highly interrelated systems, Aerospace Engineers must simultaneously understand all aspects of the complicated project that make up the design of an air vehicle. Venturing into state-of-the-art technologies, Aerospace Engineers are at the forefront of exploring all possibilities to allow people and machines to travel faster and farther, or indeed more slowly, securely, stealthily, lethally or effectively both in the atmosphere and in space.

Chemical Engineering

The Chemical Engineering programme has a strong materials engineering component. Nuclear and environmental engineering are also included to reflect the spectrum of chemical engineering interests of value to the CAF and DND. In addition to the basic chemical engineering core, the programme places emphasis on the areas of corrosion, fuel cells, batteries, alloys, polymers, ceramics, composite development, explosives, combustion processes, nuclear energy applications and environmental stewardship. All of these areas highlight the unique nature of the chemical engineering programme at RMC.

Civil Engineering

Civil Engineering courses include strength of materials, structural theory, concrete and steel design for bridges and buildings, soil mechanics, foundation and earthworks analysis and design, highway design, environmental and water resources engineering, engineering survey (Geomatics), and many other topics of relevance to Military Engineers. At the end of third year, students complete a two week survey school followed by travel to a Canadian Forces Base for a one-week field school, further developing their knowledge of data collection, report writing and presentation skills, and project management abilities.

Computer Engineering

Computer Engineers work with and understand both the hardware and software of computer systems. They fuse together aspects of electronics and applied computer science. The Computer Engineering programme at RMC offers elective concentrations that allow students to focus on the software engineering aspects of computer system design or on the electronic systems engineering aspects. Software engineering is the application of computer science to the design of new computer-based products and systems. The Electronic Systems Engineering concentration focuses more on the computer hardware aspects of system design, from studying the application of electrical and electronic systems engineering to the design of computer based systems and the embedding of computer systems in more complex products.

Electrical Engineering

The Electrical Engineering discipline involves knowledge of the theories and principles of mathematics, science, electronics and engineering to develop a deeper understanding of analog, digital, control and electromagnetic/optical design principles. Students studying within the Electrical Engineering programme will take courses that build their knowledge of one of the following streams: Power and Control, or Communications and Electronics.

Electrical Engineers use their knowledge of electrical and electronic system design to engineer some of the most complex systems of our time. They are involved in the development of smart grids for the delivery of reliable energy, advanced telecommunications networks, and the development of electric vehicles and robotics.

Mechanical Engineering

Mechanical Engineering is one of the oldest and broadest of the engineering fields. Mechanical Engineers are innovators, focusing on the analysis, design, manufacturing and maintenance of items of all sizes which extend human physical abilities, from nano-machines to large manufacturing plants. With a solid understanding of mechanics, kinematics, thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, materials science, control systems, and energy, Mechanical Engineers possess exceptional problem solving skills which are required to tackle today’s most challenging technical problems. Mechanical Engineers work in a team environment, with solid leadership and communications skills, in all levels of industry, public service and military organizations.

Faculty of Science

Bachelor of Science (Honours or a Major)

Detailed descriptions of the requirements for each science programme can be found at Undergraduate Science Programmes

Chemistry

Chemistry provides a basic building block for a broad understanding of the world around us. The principles and chemical properties learned will pervade every aspect of one’s personal and professional life. The Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering offers a BSc in Chemistry covering fundamental aspects of the chemical sciences, with applications related to the military, nuclear science, the environment, and materials. Students also have the option to specialize in Life Sciences (courses geared towards chemical biology) and/or Environmental Sciences by taking advantage of our two available Minors. 

Computer Science

The importance of computers and their applications continues to grow in almost every sector of human endeavour. With a solid foundation in mathematics, algorithm analysis, computational complexity and programming fundamentals. Graduates are well-equipped to cope with the complex systems employed throughout the CAF.

Mathematics

Apart from being a subject of study in its own right, mathematics provides practitioners in many fields with the tools to measure, analyze, and understand problems and phenomena within their respective disciplines. In today’s complex world, mathematics graduates are required in virtually all parts of our lives where mathematical modeling provides the basis of our understanding and control.  Mathematics graduates are often employed as consultants, as systems analysts or engineers, in operations research and numerous other roles.

Physics

Physics intersects with many interdisciplinary areas of research, and its boundaries are not rigidly defined. Physicists make significant contributions through advances in new technologies that arise from theoretical and experimental advances.
The physics programme offers a wide range of courses addressing many aspects of the physical sciences, such as mechanics, classical and modern physics, as well as electromagnetism and optics. Many specialized courses are offered in senior years to cater to the various branches of physics. These courses are mainly related to the three axes of research within the Physics Department: acoustics and oceanography, materials science, and space science, which includes astronomy and astrophysics. 

Space Science

The Space Science programme is a more specialized physics-based degree focused principally on topics related to space mission development and operations, space research and astronomy/astrophysics. In senior years, students are required to complete advanced space-related courses, including orbital mechanics and space concepts and applications. In the Honours programme, students take more specialized courses, including space communication and navigation and physics of the space environment. Students in the Honours programme work as a team to complete a capstone project designing a realistic space mission.
 

 

Application Procedures and Admission Requirements

  •  Admissions
  •  How to Apply
  •  A Student’s Typical Path at one of two Canadian Military Colleges
  •  Academic Prerequisites by Province
  •  Academic Programmes and Military Occupations 

Admissions

Arrival at the college

By submitting their application, students are applying for full-time employment with the CAF. RMC provides the basis for professional development as future Royal Canadian Navy, Canadian Army or Royal Canadian Air Force officers. An application to RMC is an application to serve Canada as a future officer in the CAF and to receive an exceptional education that provides the leadership skills, academic, linguistic and fitness requirements to lead.

Regular Officer Training Plan (ROTP)

Under the ROTP, the Department of National Defence (DND) pays for all costs of tuition, uniforms, books, instruments, and other essential fees. Officer cadets and naval cadets are also paid a monthly salary (from which mandatory room, board and mess dues are deducted), undergo military occupation training and, if required, second language training during the summer months. They will also receive full medical and dental care at no cost. Annual vacation with full pay is granted according to CAF regulations.

Students are required to maintain satisfactory academic, military, fitness and linguistic progression throughout the programme. Those who do not maintain a suitable level of academic performance may be permitted to repeat one year at their own expense and, if successful, be reinstated to full pay and allowances.

Upon successful completion of the ROTP, officer cadets and naval cadets receive an undergraduate degree in Engineering, Science or Arts and become fit, bilingual officers in the Royal Canadian Navy, Canadian Army or Royal Canadian Air Force. ROTP officer cadets and naval cadets are required to serve a minimum of four to five years (seven for pilots) after graduation. Students enrolled in the ROTP may request to be released from the CAF prior to the commencement of the second academic year without incurring any obligatory service or financial penalties.

How to Apply

All students interested in pursuing their studies at a CMC must apply through the Canadian Armed Forces - Apply Now and are strongly encouraged to start their application in September of their last year of high school. Those applying before January 31 of the year of enrollment increase their chances of being selected for their chosen trade and their programme of study.

Information concerning the application process can be obtained from any Canadian Forces Recruiting Centre (CFRC) at 1-800-856-8488 or at the Canadian Armed Forces

Selection Process

Since an application to the CMC is also an application to the CAF, all ROTP applicants are required to complete the following:

  • An aptitude test
  • A medical examination
  • An interview 
 
 
 
  1. Online Application | 31 January
  2. > Aptitude Test
  3. > Interview
  4. > Medical Evaluation
  5. > Selection Committee
  6. Month of May | Offer

The process can take over 6 to 8 weeks so applicants are encouraged to apply in September or October.  While January 31 is the deadline to be guaranteed to be considered for admission, candidates looking for an Air Crew or Military Police Officer occupation should apply as soon as possible as these occupations require additional testing that must be scheduled by the CFRC.

Applicants are evaluated on two fundamental criteria:
Military Potential.
The score is based on the assessment of the applicant’s aptitude, personality traits and suitability for the chosen occupation.
Academic Performance.
The Admissions Office assesses academic performance by verifying a candidate’s top six most recent marks which must include the required prerequisite courses for the applicable degree. Transcripts must include the prerequisites for the academic programme of choice.

ROTP candidates may receive an offer to study at either RMC or RMC Saint-Jean. Candidates may not choose the college they will attend: the decision is based on the candidate’s best interest and the capacity of the colleges. Senior candidates selected for RMC Saint-Jean will complete their first year of university studies and the BMOQ in Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu, Quebec, after which they will attend RMC in Kingston, Ontario, for three years or RMC Saint-Jean should they choose to study in the new International Studies programme.

General Qualifications

To qualify for admission to RMC, applicants must:

  • Be a Canadian citizen
  • Meet the minimum medical standards required for CAF enrolment
  • Pass pre-enrolment tests
  • Be at least 16 years of age at the time of nomination with parental consent
  • Possess the necessary academic qualifications
  • Have a 75% minimum academic average to apply
General Academic Qualifications

To qualify for admission to the CMCs, a student must be in the process of completing or have completed secondary school at a university preparatory level (Grade 12 or the provincial equivalent). Appllicants are required to have the necessary credits for admission to a university in the province in which they are completing secondary education as well as meet the RMC admission requirements for the programme they want to pursue. Quebec students enrolled in CEGEP must be completing or have completed the first year of a two-year pre-university programme, and will normally be expected to have completed fourteen credit courses.

Where to Start

First, find an occupation that interests you.

The CMC officer cadets and naval cadets have 20 unique and exciting occupations. Explore your options by visiting the Canadian Armed Forces or see the Academic programmes and military occupations chart.

Then find a degree programme that interests you.

RMC offers 19 undergraduate degree programmes, some of which are required for specific occupations.

  ROTP Student's typical path at one of the two Canadian military colleges

 
 
  1. Application Submitted
  2. Offer Accepted
  3. BMOQ - part 1
  4. To RMC St-Jean
  5. Preparatory Year
  6. BMOQ - part 2
  7. 1st Year
  8. Military Training - Vacation, second language course, On the Job Employment (OJE), or military training.
  9. To RMC for 2nd Year (for all programmes less International Studies)
  10. 2nd Year
  11. Military Training - Vacation, second language course, On the Job Employment (OJE), or military training.
  12. 3rd Year
  13. Military Training
  14. 4th Year
  15. Convocation
  16. Commission
  17. Military Career
  1. Application Submitted
  2. Offer Accepted
  3. BMOQ - part 1
  4. To RMC St-Jean
  5. 1st Year
  6. BMOQ - part 2
  7. To RMC for 2nd Year (for all programmes less International Studies)
  8. 2nd Year
  9. Military Training - Vacation, second language course, On the Job Employment (OJE), or military training.
  10. 3rd Year
  11. Military Training - Vacation, second language course, On the Job Employment (OJE), or military training.
  12. 4th Year
  13. Convocation
  14. Commission
  15. Military Career
  1. Application Submitted
  2. Offer Accepted
  3. BMOQ - part 1
  4. To RMC
  5. 1st Year
  6. BMOQ - part 2
  7. 2nd Year
  8. Military Training - Vacation, second language course, On the Job Employment (OJE), or military training.
  9. 3rd Year
  10. Military Training - Vacation, second language course, On the Job Employment (OJE), or military training.
  11. 4th Year
  12. Convocation
  13. Commission
  14. Military Career
  1. Application Submitted
  2. Offer Accepted
  3. BMOQ - part 1
  4. To RMC
  5. 1st Year
  6. BMOQ - part 2
  7. To RMC Saint-Jean for 2nd Year (for the International Studies Programme only)
  8. 2nd Year
  9. Military Training - Vacation, second language course, On the Job Employment (OJE), or military training.
  10. 3rd Year
  11. Military Training - Vacation, second language course, On the Job Employment (OJE), or military training.
  12. 4th Year
  13. Convocation
  14. Commission
  15. Military Career
 

Academic prerequisites by province

  • All degree programmes are offered in English and n French. A student will normally register in academic courses given in the student’s first official language. Students who have reached the functional level in their second language may register in courses in their second language and in courses taught in a bilingual format.
  • Applicants who do not meet the prerequisite course requirements but have high academic standing may be considered for admission.
  • Elective courses taken to complete a secondary school programme should be chosen carefully to strengthen academic preparation.
  • Required course codes may vary in response to changes in provincial education course coding systems.
  • The CMC Admission Board reserves the right to reject applications on the basis of overall academic record, even where entrance requirements have been met. Normally, an applicant who has been required to withdraw from another university or college for academic reasons will not be considered for admission until a full academic year has elapsed.
 
Province or Territory Arts Engineering Science
Alberta
  • English 30-1; &
  • Mathematics 30-2
  • English 30-1; &
  • Mathematics 30-1; &
  • Mathematics 31; &
  • Chemistry 30; &
  • Physics 30
  • English 30-1; &
  • Mathematics 30-1; &
  • Any two of the following:
    • Mathematics 31
    • Chemistry 30
    • Physics 30
    • Biology 30
British Columbia
  • English 12; &
  • Pre-Calculus 11
  • English 12; &
  • Calculus 12, or Pre-Calculus 12; &
  • Chemistry 12; &
  • Physics 12
  • English 12; &
  • Pre-Calculus 12; &
  • Any two of the following:
    • Calculus 12
    • Chemistry 12
    • Physics 12
    • Biology 12.
Manitoba
  • English 40S; &
  • Pre-Calculus 30
  • English 40S; &
  • Pre-Calculus Mathematics 40S; &
  • Chemistry 40S; &
  • Physics 40S
  • English 40S; &
  • Pre-Calculus  Mathematics 40S; &
  • Any two of the following:
    • Applied Mathematics 40S
    • Chemistry 40S
    • Physics 40S
    • Biology 40S
New Brunswick (English sector)
  • English 122; &
  • Pre-Calculus 110
  • English 122; &
  • Pre-Calculus A 120; &
  • Pre-Calculus B 120, or Calculus 120; &
  • Physics 121 or 122; &
  • Chemistry 121 or 122
  • English 122; & .
  • Pre-Calculus A 120; &
  • Pre-Calculus B 120; &
  • Any two of the following:
    • Physics 121 or 122
    • Chemistry 121 or 122
    • Biology 121 or 122
    • Calculus 120
New Brunswick (French sector)
  • French 10411; &
  • Mathematics 30311B, or Mathematics 30331C
  • French 10411; &
  • Mathematics 30421C; &
  • Mathematics 30411B, or Mathematics 30411C; &
  • Physics 51411; &
  • Chemistry 52411
  • French 10411; &
  • Mathematics 30411B, or Mathematics 30411C; &
  • Any two of the following:
    • Physics 51411
    • Chemistry 52411
    • Biology 53411
    • Math 30421C
Newfoundland and Labrador
  • English 3201 or 3202; &
  • Mathematics 2200
  • English 3201 or 3202; &
  • Mathematics 3200; &
  • Mathematics 3208; &
  • Chemistry 3202; &
  • Physics 3204
  • English 3201 or 3202; &
  • Mathematics 3200; &
  • Any two of the following:
    • Mathematics 3208
    • Chemistry 3202
    • Physics 3204
    • Biology 3201
Northwest Territories
  • English 30-1; &
  • Mathematics 30-2
  • English 30-1; &
  • Mathematics 30-1; &
  • Mathematics 31; &
  • Chemistry 30; &
  • Physics 30
  • English 30-1; &
  • Mathematics 30-1; &
  • Any two of the following:
    • Mathematics 31
    • Chemistry 30
    • Physics 30
    • Biology 30
Nova Scotia
  • English 12
  • Pre-Calculus 11
  • English 12,  &
  • Pre-Calculus 12, &
  • Calculus 12; &
  • Chemistry 12; &
  • Physics 12
  • English 12;  &
  • Pre-Calculus 12; &
  • Any two of the following:
    • Calculus 12
    • Chemistry 12
    • Physics 12
    • Biology 12
Nunavut
  • English 30-1; &
  • Mathematics 30-2
  • English 30-1; &
  • Mathematics 30-1; &
  • Mathematics 31; &
  • Chemistry 30; &
  • Physics 30
  • English 30-1; &
  • Mathematics 30-1; &
  • Any two of the following:
    • Mathematics 31
    • Chemistry 30
    • Physics 30
    • Biology 30
Ontario
  • English ENG4U; & 
  • Functions MCF3M; &
  • 4 more 4U or 4M courses
  • English ENG4U; &
  • Advanced Functions MHF4U; &
  • Calculus and Vectors MCV4U; &
  • Chemistry SCH4U; &
  • Physics SPH4U; &
  • Plus 1 course at the 4& or 4M level
  • English ENG4U; &
  • Advanced Functions MHF4U; &
  • Any two of the following:
    • Calculus and Vectors MCV4U
    • Chemistry SCH4U
    • Physics SPH4U
    • Biology SBI4U
  • And two courses at the 4U or 4M level
Prince Edward Island
  • English 621; &
  • Mathematics 521
  • English 621;  &
  • Mathematics 611B; &
  • Mathematics 621B; &
  • Chemistry 621A; &
  • Physics 621A
  • English 621; &
  • Mathematics 621B; &
  • Any two of the following:
    • Mathematics 611B
    • Chemistry 621A
    • Physics 621A
    • Biology 621A
Quebec
  • English (French)- 2 core courses; &
  • One of the following:
    • Sec V Math Technical and Scientific option (064506 or 564506)
    • (Prior to 2010) Sec V Mathematics 526
  • English (French) - 2 Core courses; &
  • Mathematics 201-NYA-05; &
  • Mathematics 201-NYC-05; &
  • Mathematics 201-NYB-05; &
  • Chemistry 202-NYA-05; &
  • Physics 203-NYA-05
  • English (French) - 2 Core courses; &
  • One of the following
    • Mathematics 201-NYA-05
    • Mathematics 201-NYC-05
    • Mathematics 201-NYB-05
  • And any two of the following:
    • An additional Math from above
    • Chemistry 202-NYA-05
    • Physics 203-NYA-05
    • Biology 101-NYA-05
Saskatchewan
  • English 30A; &
  • English 30B; &
  • One of the following:
    • Foundations of Mathematics 20
    • Foundations of Mathematics 30
    • Pre-Calculus 20
  • English 30A; &
  • English 30B; &
  • Pre-Calculus 30 &
  • Calculus 30; &
  • Chemistry 30, &
  • Physics 30
  • English 30A; &
  • English 30B; &
  • Pre-Calculus 30 &
  • Any two of the following:
    • Calculus 30
    • Chemistry 30
    • Physics 30
    • Biology 30
Yukon
  • English 12; &
  • Pre-Calculus 11
  • English 12; &
  • Calculus 12; &
  • Pre-Calculus 12; &
  • Chemistry 12; &
  • Physic 12
  • English 12; &
  • Pre-Calculus 12, &
  • Any two of the following:
    • Calculus 12
    • Chemistry 12
    • Physics 12
    • Biology 12
 

Academic programmes and military occupations

This table is intended as a guide and its content is subject to change consistently with CAF occupation development. Please speak to a recruiting advisor to confirm you have the most up to date information.

There is no course selection deadline. First Year university curriculum is provided to officer cadets and naval cadets upon arrival at RMC or at RMC Saint-Jean if the International Studies programme is selected.

Upon successful completion of First Year, officer cadets and naval cadets will select their degree specialisation; their military occupation and academic programme must be compatible.

Legend

?  =  Programmes possibly acceptable – Check with a Recruiting Advisor.
  • navy
  • army
  • air force
Occupation Business Administration Economics English, Culture, and Communication French, Literature, and Culture History International Studies Military and Strategic Studies Political Science Psychology Aeronautical Engineering Chemical Engineering Civil Engineering Computer Engineering Electrical Engineering Mechanical Engineering Chemistry Computer Science Mathematics Physics Space Science
Armour Officer Army Army Army Army Army Army Army Army Army Army Army Army Army Army Army Army Army Army Army ?
Artillery Officer Army Army Army Army Army Army Army Army Army Army Army Army Army Army Army Army Army Army Army Army
Infantry Officer Army Army Army Army Army Army Army Army Army Army Army Army Army Army Army Army Army Army Army Army
Engineer Officer ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? Army Army Army Army Army Army ? Army Army Army Army
Signals Officer ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? Army Army ? Army Army Army Army Army
Electrical and Mechanical Engineering Officer ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? Army Army Army Army Army Army Army Army Army Army Army
Pilot Air Air Air Air Air Air Air Air Air Air Air Air Air Air Air Air Air Air Air Air
Air Combat Systems Officer Air Air Air Air Air Air Air Air Air Air Air Air Air Air Air ? Air Air Air Air
Aerospace Control Officer Air Air Air Air Air Air Air Air Air Air Air Air Air Air Air ? Air Air Air Air
Aerospace Engineering Officer ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? Air Air ? Air Air Air ? Air ? ? Air
Construction Engineering Officer ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? Air Air ? Air Air ? ? ? ? ?
Communications and Electronics Engineering  Officer ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? Air ? ? Air Air Air ? Air Air Air Air
Naval Warfare Officer Navy ? ? ? ? Navy Navy Navy Navy Navy Navy Navy Navy Navy Navy Navy Navy Navy Navy Navy
Naval Combat Systems Engineering Officer ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? Navy Navy Navy Navy Navy Navy ? Navy Navy Navy ?
Marine Systems Engineering Officer ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? Navy Navy Navy Navy Navy Navy ? Navy Navy Navy ?
Logistics Officer Navy
Army
Air
Navy
Army
Air
Navy
Army
Air
Navy
Army
Air
Navy
Army
Air
Navy
Army
Air
Navy
Army
Air
Navy
Army
Air
Navy
Army
Air
Navy
Army
Air
Navy
Army
Air
Navy
Army
Air
Navy
Army
Air
Navy
Army
Air
Navy
Army
Air
Navy
Army
Air
Navy
Army
Air
Navy
Army
Air
Navy
Army
Air
Navy
Army
Air
Health Care Adminstration Officer Navy
Army
Air
? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ?
Intelligence Officer ? ? ? ? Navy
Army
Air
Navy
Army
Air
Navy
Army
Air
Navy
Army
Air
? ? ? ? Navy
Army
Air
? ? ? Navy
Army
Air
? ? ?
 Military Police Officer Navy
Army
Air
Navy
Army
Air
Navy
Army
Air
Navy
Army
Air
Navy
Army
Air
Navy
Army
Air
Navy
Army
Air
Navy
Army
Air
Navy
Army
Air
Navy
Army
Air
Navy
Army
Air
Navy
Army
Air
Navy
Army
Air
Navy
Army
Air
Navy
Army
Air
Navy
Army
Air
Navy
Army
Air
Navy
Army
Air
Navy
Army
Air
Navy
Army
Air
Personnel Selection Officer ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? Navy
Army
Air
? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ?
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